Martin Luther in The Bondage of the Will — Post #1

I just finished Luther’s opening response to Erasmus of Rotterdam in The Bondage of the Will. Luther raises an interesting conundrum at the end of this opening section. Is the post-fall human will in such a state that it may strive and attain to salvation, and at the same time, can it be true that “without the mercy of God the will is ineffective”? He also argues that it is essential to know the answer to this, stating that to shove this debate into the realm of unknowable mystery, ambiguity, or obscurity leaves humanity stranded, not knowing what is truly efficacious or inefficacious, what is active and what is passive in salvation.

Where do you stand in this debate?

  1. #1 by kash on August 13, 2011 - 8:44 pm

    i am a refined wesleyan. the cross provided prevenieny grace, enabling the will. therefore all statements in scripture can be upheld. calvinists do some interesting gymnastics when looking at old testament passages— tacitly suggesting the nt and its bondage of the will passages supercedes the old testament torah living will.

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